Wannabe Tumblr famous. Also check out my other blogs, Other Rhythms and Earwormology.

2nd February 2014

Photo reblogged from The invisible man with the see-through mind. with 71 notes

la-dulzura:

Barbara Steele

la-dulzura:

Barbara Steele

Tagged: barbara steeleclassic movie starsportraitsphotographywomenflowers

6th January 2014

Photo reblogged from Blue Ruins with 285 notes


Barbara Steele, 1960

Barbara Steele, 1960

Tagged: barbara steeleclassic movie starsportraitswomen

Source: divasmonroe

31st December 2013

Photo reblogged from Blue Ruins with 35 notes

coldbloodedbeast:

Barbara Steele in The Mask of Satan (1960). 

coldbloodedbeast:

Barbara Steele in The Mask of Satan (1960). 

Tagged: black sundaythe mask of satan1960s moviesmovie postersbarbara steele

Source: coldbloodedbeast

7th October 2013

Photo reblogged from Blue Ruins with 62 notes

blueruins:

Barbara Steele

blueruins:

Barbara Steele

Tagged: Barbara Steeleclassic movie starsportraitswomen

Source: barbarasteeleforever

1st October 2013

Photo reblogged from The invisible man with the see-through mind. with 53 notes

rogerwilkerson:

Barbara Steele - Black Sunday (1960)

rogerwilkerson:

Barbara Steele - Black Sunday (1960)

Tagged: black sunday1960s moviesBarbara Steele

Source: rogerwilkerson

10th September 2013

Photo reblogged from The air itself is filled with monsters... with 44 notes

classicteamcgs:

Day 7 - ‘Classic Actresses of the UK’ (post 2/4):
Barbara Steele.

classicteamcgs:

Day 7 - ‘Classic Actresses of the UK’ (post 2/4):

Barbara Steele.

Tagged: Barbara Steeleclassic movie starsportraitswomen

Source: leilahyams

25th August 2013

Photo reblogged from The invisible man with the see-through mind. with 22 notes

horrornewsnetwork:

The 13 Most Deranged Horror Director Debuts:
5.  Black Sunday (1960)—Mario Bava

As the primary architect of the Italian horror phenomenon, Mario Bava was both the genre’s technical genius and savior, salvaging movies that had been abandoned such as The Giant of Marathon (1959), Caltiki the Immortal Monster (1959), and, most significantly, I Vampiri (1956), considered the first contemporary Italian horror film. As a show of gratitude, Galatea Films gave him the chance to make his own film. Choosing to loosely adapt Gogol’s weird tale “Viy,” Bava used all his cinematic skills to create Black Sunday, an atmospheric, lushly photographed black and white fairy tale involving the resurrection of a vampiric witch looking for revenge on the descendants of those who imprisoned her. The film begins with some of the most memorable imagery in horror cinema: a huge shirtless masked executioner (who kind of looks like one of The Mentors) welds an enormous hammer and smashes a spiked iron mask onto the face of a beautiful woman as blood spurts out of her orifices. As fog swirls, the faceless inquisitors watch the witch being burnt, enveloped in darkness so thick and black it gives the appearance of perpetual sorrow, like if Bergman had made The Seventh Seal for Universal Studios in the 30’s.  Black Sunday is the most Gothic film ever made:  a ruined crypt, a violated tomb, secret passages, a haunted castle, ancient curses, and a threatened romance. Bava’s eye for the macabre is unparalleled with images such as scorpions scurrying out of a corpse’s eye sockets and a reanimated vampire crawling his way out of his unsanctified grave. The presence of Euro cult queen Barbara Steele, playing both the wicked Aja and the virginal Katia, elevates Black Sunday from classic to god head status as her decadent beauty (like a living Edward Gorey drawing)personifies elegance and corruption, the attraction/repulsion that illuminates so much of European horror. Bava would make a litany of amazing films that influenced the next generation of horror, from Friday the 13th to Sleepy Hollow. Even Martin Scorsese paid tribute to the maestro in his masterpiece The Last Temptation of Christ, proving that Bava’s rococo power extends well past the dark recesses of the horror genre.

horrornewsnetwork:

The 13 Most Deranged Horror Director Debuts:

5.  Black Sunday (1960)—Mario Bava

As the primary architect of the Italian horror phenomenon, Mario Bava was both the genre’s technical genius and savior, salvaging movies that had been abandoned such as The Giant of Marathon (1959), Caltiki the Immortal Monster (1959), and, most significantly, I Vampiri (1956), considered the first contemporary Italian horror film. As a show of gratitude, Galatea Films gave him the chance to make his own film. Choosing to loosely adapt Gogol’s weird tale “Viy,” Bava used all his cinematic skills to create Black Sunday, an atmospheric, lushly photographed black and white fairy tale involving the resurrection of a vampiric witch looking for revenge on the descendants of those who imprisoned her. The film begins with some of the most memorable imagery in horror cinema: a huge shirtless masked executioner (who kind of looks like one of The Mentors) welds an enormous hammer and smashes a spiked iron mask onto the face of a beautiful woman as blood spurts out of her orifices. As fog swirls, the faceless inquisitors watch the witch being burnt, enveloped in darkness so thick and black it gives the appearance of perpetual sorrow, like if Bergman had made The Seventh Seal for Universal Studios in the 30’s.  Black Sunday is the most Gothic film ever made:  a ruined crypt, a violated tomb, secret passages, a haunted castle, ancient curses, and a threatened romance. Bava’s eye for the macabre is unparalleled with images such as scorpions scurrying out of a corpse’s eye sockets and a reanimated vampire crawling his way out of his unsanctified grave. The presence of Euro cult queen Barbara Steele, playing both the wicked Aja and the virginal Katia, elevates Black Sunday from classic to god head status as her decadent beauty (like a living Edward Gorey drawing)personifies elegance and corruption, the attraction/repulsion that illuminates so much of European horror. Bava would make a litany of amazing films that influenced the next generation of horror, from Friday the 13th to Sleepy Hollow. Even Martin Scorsese paid tribute to the maestro in his masterpiece The Last Temptation of Christ, proving that Bava’s rococo power extends well past the dark recesses of the horror genre.

Tagged: black sunday1960s moviesmario bavabarbara steele

Source: horrornewsnetwork

8th August 2013

Photo reblogged from The air itself is filled with monsters... with 52 notes


Barbara Steele photographed as a 20th Century-Fox player c.1960

Barbara Steele photographed as a 20th Century-Fox player c.1960

Tagged: Barbara Steeleclassic movie starsportraitswomen

Source: pollyjeanharveys

5th August 2013

Photo reblogged from The air itself is filled with monsters... with 36 notes

Tagged: black sunday1960s moviesBarbara Steeledogs

Source:

8th July 2013

Photo reblogged from Slobber Drool Drip Has Risen from the Grave with 7 notes

ronaldcmerchant:

Barbra Steele -the CRIMSON CULT (1968) aka CURSE OF THE CRIMSON ALTER

ronaldcmerchant:

Barbra Steele -the CRIMSON CULT (1968) aka CURSE OF THE CRIMSON ALTER

Tagged: the crimson cultcurse of the crimson altar1960s moviesBarbara Steelewomen

28th June 2013

Photo reblogged from The air itself is filled with monsters... with 52 notes

Tagged: barbara steele1960s movies

Source: horrorgasmo

22nd June 2013

Photo reblogged from 52 Bees! with 111 notes

antipahtico:

Barbara Steele ~ Black Sunday ~ La Maschera Del Demonio (1960)

antipahtico:

Barbara Steele ~ Black Sunday ~ La Maschera Del Demonio (1960)

Tagged: black sunday1960s moviesbarbara steelegif

Source: maudit

12th June 2013

Photoset reblogged from The air itself is filled with monsters... with 26 notes

retrospex:

Barbara Steele in La maschera del Demonio (Mask of Satan/Black Sunday, 1960).

Tagged: black sunday1960s moviesBarbara Steele

Source: splendorsofyoungandfilthy

20th January 2013

Photo reblogged from Blue Ruins with 86 notes

cultqueens:

Barbara Steele, “Nightmare Castle”, 1965.

cultqueens:

Barbara Steele, “Nightmare Castle”, 1965.

Tagged: Nightmare Castle1960s moviesBarbara Steelewomen

Source: bacchanales-sexuelles

1st October 2012

Photo reblogged from Blue Ruins with 142 notes

rogerwilkerson:

Barbara Steele - Black Sunday - 1960

rogerwilkerson:

Barbara Steele - Black Sunday - 1960

Tagged: Barbara SteeleBlack Sunday1960s movies

Source: rogerwilkerson